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Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2010

Funded in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts and Pacifica station listeners, this one-year project brings to life fragile and deteriorating reel- to-reel tapes of national significance. Three categories of tapes were selected that highlight some of the strengths of our collection:

Pacifica and Politics: Pacifica’s extensive collection of political programs, covering a variety of topics such as Watergate, COINTELPRO, race and gender relations, featuring personalities such as Robert Krulwich, Jimmy Breslin, Dorothy Healy, Bella Abzug, Ron Dellums and Margo St. James.

Student Free Speech Movement: PRA owns the largest known collection of media coverage of the Free Speech Movement protests of 1964-1965, in which UC Berkeley students revolted against the university administration’s decision to ban on-campus political organizing. The voices of some of the most important organizers and participants can be heard here, such as Mario Savio, Bettina Aptheker, Art Goldberg, Jackie Goldberg, Steven Weissman, and more.

Radio Arts: This collection features some of the arts and culture programming featured on Pacifica Radio’s airwaves over the years. Among the tapes included here are interviews with Gore Vidal, Gary Snyder, Diane DiMassa, Toni Morrison, Harvey Fierstein and Judy Chicago; performances and readings by Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara, Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers, Odetta, Pete Seeger, and Jill Johnston; and the absurdist antics of KPFK’s notorious comedy troupe, the Firesign Theatre.

Notice for copyright claimants: The Pacifica Radio Archives will honor all takedown requests in compliance with the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and other applicable intellectual copyright laws. Please send all copyright inquiries to info@pacificaradioarchives.org or to the Archives’ physical address at: 3729 Cahuenga Boulevard West, North Hollywood, CA, 91604 c/o Archives Director for review. Claimants are advised to leave detailed contact information including name, telephone number, e-mail address, and/or physical address where they may be reached, as well as all information pertaining to the specific nature of the complaint.

This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.


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Several voices come together to tell the four part documentary on the life and influence of Nelson Mandela, South African president who served from 1994-1999 and the first president to be elected in South Africa by a representative democratic election. Sandra Radley is the producer, writer, and narrator. Bill Wax is the executive producer.
Source: KPFA
French-Cuban Author Anais Nin (1903-1977) reads excerpts from her memoirs "The Diary of Anais Nin" which she began writing at the age of 11and continued to write until her death. She is also the author of "Cities of the Interior" and is aslo well known for her erotica literature.
Source: KPFA
Aircheck of the Firesign Theater program "Dear Friends: Let's Eat." Firesign Theater is an American comedy group which consists of Phil Austin (Nick Danger), Philip Proctor, Peter Bergman, and David Ossman.
Source: KPFK
Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers perform at the Village Gate with Art Blakey (1919-1990) on drums, Walter Davis, Jr. on piano, Dennis Irwin on bass, David Schnitter on tenor sax, Bobby Watson on Alto Sax, and Valery Ponomarev on trumpet. The group performs Walter Davis, Jr.'s "Jodi," David Schnitter's "Mishima," and two other songs.
Source: WBAI
WBAI's raises funds by having a Pete Seeger marathon. Seeger performs several songs which include "Waist Deep in the Big Muddy", "Tomorrow is a Highway", "God Bless the Grass", Woody Guthrie's "Put Your Finger in the Air", 'Seek and You Shall Find", and several more. He weaves various stories throughout his performance.
Source: WBAI
Program dedicated to political songwriter and performer Phil Ochs (1940-1976) that includes a May 1973 Studs Terkel interview with Ochs and close friend Bob Gibson, and Ed Pearl interviewing Ochs' brother and manager Michael. Studs Terkel interview includes Ochs and Gibson singing songs from and discussing Ochs' life and musical career. Michael Ochs talks to Ed Pearl about Phil and plays songs from Chords of Fame, a best-of compilation Michael produced months after Phil's death. Broadcast on...
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Source: KPFK
Mort Sahl (1927- ) is a Canadian-born American comedian is who was the first to perform on college campuses and also the first to record a live album. In 1960, he was featured on the cover of Times Magazine. Much of his material was based on current events and politics which led him to be an inspiration to comedians such as Jay Leno and Woody Allen.
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Source: KPFK
Meg Christian performs at the Women's Music Festival just after the release of her album Turning it over, on Olivia Records.
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Source: KPFK
Actuality of the Women Take Back the Night march held in Los Angeles on April 19, 1980. Contains a speech by feminist activist Andrea Dworkin (1946-1995), the Los Angeles Women's Chorus and the Great American Yankee Freedom Band of Los Angeles perform, interviews with participants and actualities from the crowd.
Source: KPFK
Dylan Thomas (1914-1953) reads Chapter 1 of Sean O'Casey's autobiography "I Knock at the Door", Gerard Manley Hopkins' poem "The Leaden Echo and the Golden Echo, and Wilfred Owen's poem "Strange Meeting"(cut off) at the YM-YWHA Poetry Center on 92nd Street Y in New York City on May 15, 1952. Thomas is a Welsh-born poet and writer short stories and film and radio scripts.
Source: KPFA
Four Los Angeles area gang members, Spud and Jason (Belok) of the Bloods, and Cedric (Baby Nerve) and Nate (Caliber) of the Crips recount how they got involved with gangs, everyday life as a gang member, the drugs and killings associated with gangs, what gangs represent to them, the economic problems confronting inner city youth, harassment by the police, relationships between Koreans and African-Americans, gangs coming together to protect their community, voting, and tearing down the system....
Source: KPFK
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2010
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Richard Claxton "Dick" Gregory gives a speech on June 7, 1970 at the Longshoreman's Hall in San Francisco at a benefit sponsored by the Committee United for Political Prisoners. Gregory states his feelings that America's problems are every American's responsibility, and that young people are the new target of repression by the government.
Source: KPFA
Program dedicated to political songwriter and performer Phil Ochs (1940-1976) that includes a May 1973 Studs Terkel interview with Ochs and close friend Bob Gibson, and Ed Pearl interviewing Ochs' brother and manager Michael. Studs Terkel interview includes Ochs and Gibson singing songs from and discussing Ochs' life and musical career. Michael Ochs talks to Ed Pearl about Phil and plays songs from Chords of Fame, a best-of compilation Michael produced months after Phil's death. Broadcast on...
Source: KPFK
WBAI fundraiser "Dizzy Gillespie Day" held at the Village Gate in New York City on August 30, 1977. This recording contains part one of the event, an interview with Dizzy Gillespie's guitarist Rodney Jones and the music of jazz pianist Rio Clemente. See IZ0991 for part two of this event, Dizzy Gillespie performing at the Village Gate.
Source: WBAI
Fidel Castro speaks to the General Assembly at the 50th Anniversary of the United Nations on October 22, 1995 at the Abyssinian Church in Harlem, New York City. He talks about the birth of the United Nations and the gap of inequality that is growing between developed and underdeveloped nations. He speaks of how many developed countries represented by the United Nations, resist Cubaメs political and cultural views, and he speaks about the United Statesメ embargo block against Cuba . He also...
Source: WBAI
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2010
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Oedipus was presented by Performance Group of New York City in December of 1977 and January of 1978. The play was written by Roman playwright, philosopher, and political adviser, Lucius Annaeus Seneca in 50 A.D. and was based on the classical Greek play, Oedipus Rex by Sophocles written 500 years earlier. It was performed at the Performing Garage in the Soho area of New York. The play was adapted by Ted Hughes from a translation by David Anthony Turner, and directed by Richard Schechner.
Source: WBAI
Toni Morrison is an African-American novelist who won the Nobel Peace Prize for Literature in 1993 and the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction for her book Beloved" in 1988. Other of her works include "The Bluest Eye," "Sula," and "Song of Solomon." Contains sensitive language.
Source: WBAI
Report on the murder trial of Paul Skyhorse and Richard Mohawk, including a report on recent events in Ventura County by Bruce Robinson, a brief background of the case by Tim McGovern, a report by investigator for the defense, Paula Giese, and speeches on the government conspiracy to frame the American Indian Movement (AIM) leaders given at a rally at UCLA on October 17, 1976, the second anniversary of the defendants' arrest. Speakers include AIM leaders Dennis Banks and Ernie Peters, and...
Source: KPFK
The documentary on the Free Speech Movement of the sixties begins with a sit-in of 6,000 students at the administration building, Sproul Hall. Various speakers voice their concerns and opinions regarding students' rights and the faculty's involvement. Recorded is the arrest of Jack Weinberg, a recent graduate and civil rights activist. Mario Savio speaks to the demonstrators at the protest. Followed are Free Speech Movement songs with unidentified artists. From album produced by Dustin Mark...
Source: WBAI
Carlos Hagen produced this special tribute to French singer Edith Piaf, originally offered during the October minithon and enthusiastically received. A documentary on the art, style and life of Piaf, abundantly illustrated with some of the best examples of her art, including a number of rare recordings of her songs. The program dramatically traces the arc of Piaf's life, including her early abandonment by her parents on the sidewalks of Paris; her upbringing in a brothel; making a living as a...
Source: KPFK
Carlos Hagen produced this special tribute to French singer Edith Piaf, originally offered during the October minithon and enthusiastically received. A documentary on the art, style and life of Piaf, abundantly illustrated with some of the best examples of her art, including a number of rare recordings of her songs. In this section, Hagen discusses the evolution of her singing style over the years, her final marriage to hairdresser-turned-singer Theo Sarapo in 1962, and her death from cancer in...
Source: KPFK
Tim Butz, co-editor of "Counterspy" magazine, talks about the FBI's COINTELPRO counter-intelligence program, the CIA's operation CHAOS, and domestic spying in the United States. Broadcast on KPFK May 30, 1975(?).
Source: KPFK
Four veterans from the Abraham Lincoln Battalion discuss their experiences as American volunteers fighting against Franco in Spain. The four volunteers include Steve Nelson (1903-1993), Robert "Bob" Steck (1912-2007), Lawrence "Larry" Cane, and Maury Kolow. The Abraham Lincoln Battalion, also know as the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, consisted of about 2,800 American volunteers who went to Spain to fight for the Spanish Republic and to stop facism. The interviews are introduced...
Source: WBAI
Four gang members from opposing gangs--Spud and Jason(Belok) of the Bloods, and Cedric(Baby Nerve) and Nate(Caliber) of the Crips, talk about the Rodney King beating and the civil unrest that followed the police aquittals, the relationship of gangs to the police, relationships between Koreans and African-Americans, the systematic oppression of African-Americans in the United States, and creating unity with the black community. Recorded in Los Angeles, May 1992.
Source: KPFK
Former CIA agent Philip Agee (1935-2008) talks to Pacifica's Pat Hynds about the dangers of counter revolution in Nicaragua, as fomented by CIA activities including the propaganda campaign, economic destabilization, and military maneuvers around Grenada. He discusses the revocation of his passport, the Intelligence Identity Protection Act, the similarity and differences between the revolutions in Nicaragua, Chile, and Cuba, and explains his critique of Haig's "White Paper" on El...
Source: KPFK
Recording contains Susan Anderson's 1976 interview with Maya Angelou, talking about her new book Singin' and Swingin' and Gettin' Merry Like Christmas, her first friendship with a white woman, her sense of religion, her career, and her never ending sense of frustration with her writing. Recording also includes excerpts from Angelou's 1982 speech given at Los Angeles Community College talking about the differences between white women and black women and the women's movement. During her speech...
Source: KPFK
Pacifica Radio Archives: National Endowment for the Arts Grant 2010
audio
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Oedipus was presented by Performance Group of New York City in December of 1977 and January of 1978. The play was written by Roman playwright, philosopher, and political adviser, Lucius Annaeus Seneca in 50 A.D. and was based on the classical Greek play, Oedipus Rex by Sophocles written 500 years earlier. It was performed at the Performing Garage in the Soho area of New York. The play was adapted by Ted Hughes from a translation by David Anthony Turner, and directed by Richard Schechner
Source: WBAI
Gore Vidal is an America novelist, playwright, and critic. He wrote a collection of essays called "The United States 1952-1992" which won the 1993 National Book Award. Maldari announces that Vidal will be the featured speaker at Zellerbach Hall in Berkeley on February 14, 1994.
Source: KPFA
Ross Greenberg and Dave Bernstein interview Steve Fried of Microway, which is Intel's 5th largest customer for all their microcomputer components. Hank Kee interviews Bill Gates of Microsoft. He shares his views of yesterday, today, and tomorrow in personal computing. The interview was recorded in the patio of a hotel so the sound quality varies.
Source: WBAI
The documentary on the Watergate affair, part three, covers the fall of 1973. The two hour chronology of highlights of phase 1 of the Senate Watergate hearings from May 17, 1973 to August 7, 1973. The program also includes Watergate news that took place outside of the hearing room. It is a comprehensive look at the way Watergate unfolded through radio and television in almost every household in not only America, but other countries as well.
Source: KPFK
Speech by congressman Ronald Vernie "Ron" Dellums given at the 54th anniversary event of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade. Dellums looks back at his 20 years in Congress, beginning with his going to Congress "in the name of peace and justice...to oppose the war in Vietnam." He talks of how he later opposed "the mentality of the Cold war," and his joy when the Berlin wall came down and there was talk about peace dividends. He voices his opposition to financing weapons...
Collage of readings, speeches, and testimony on foreign and domestic espionage performed by the CIA. Part 1. Victor Marchetti discusses why he left the CIA and his criticisms of CIA activities (see KZ0390 )--Part 2. CIA director William Colby's 1975 testimony before the House Miliatary Appropriations Subcommittee regarding CIA files being kept on Americans--Part 3. John D. Marks, former State Department employee and co-Author of "The CIA and the Cult of Intelligence" discusses CIA...
Source: KPFK
Gary Synder (b. 1930), Pulitzer Prize winning poet (1975), reads and discusses his work and it's world context. Synder reads the title poem from his latest publication, "Axe Handles." Synder discusses meditation, Buddhism and martial arts before reciting another poem "Breasts." Synder examines the Reagan administration's policies towards the Third World, nuclear disarmament and tribal people, then reads "Cricket" and explores the aesthetics of simple poetry. Synder...
Source: KPFK
Philip Maldari interviews Edward Said, Palestinian-American literary theorist and Palestinian rights activist, after the publication of his book, "Out of Place, A Memoir", which was winner of the 1999 New Yorker prize for non-fiction. They talk about Israel and Palestine and the criticism of the book.
Source: KPFA
Improvisational comedy duo Jerry Stiller and Anne Meara perform as The Barretts of Bleecker Street in the WBAI studio. BROADCAST: WBAI October 1962 and 4 Apr. 1966 and KPFA November 1962 and January 1963.
Source: WBAI
Reporter, Bert, collects miscellaneous student commentary from around the UC Berkeley campus, then reads the handbill from University Student for Law and Order. He reads "Machiavelianism" posting and criticizes Clark Kerr's handling of student protesters. Following at the Greek Theater podium, Mario Savio expresses his thoughts on Kerr's attempt to preempt the Academic Senate, which voted to support the Freedom of Speech Movement (FSM). Faculty representatives and Kerr then take...
Russell Means (1939- ) , American Indian Movement leader, discusses the Indian in U.S. history, the occupation of Wounded Knee, and the attitude of South Dakota toward its Native American inhabitants.
Source: KPFK
The documentary on the Watergate affair, part three, covers the fall of 1973. The two hour chronology of highlights of phase 1 of the Senate Watergate hearings from May 17, 1973 to August 7, 1973. The program also includes Watergate news that took place outside of the hearing room. It is a comprehensive look at the way Watergate unfolded through radio and television in almost every household in not only America, but other countries as well.
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Source: KPFK
Marc Cooper of the Nation magazine hosts this Radio Nation update on the Third Ministerial Meeting of the World Trade Organization, known as "The Battle in Seattle." Co-hosts include John Nichols and Doug Henwood of the the Nation magazine. Recording contains highlights of the meetings, interviews with protesters outside the conference, interviews with labor leaders including George Becker and Jose Bove, and Harold Meyerson from the LA Weekly. Contains audio from DAT0009.
Source: KPFK
The two hour chronology of highlights of phase 1 of the Senate Watergate hearings from May 17, 1973 to August 7, 1973. The program also includes Watergate news that took place outside of the hearing room. It is a comprehensive look at the way Watergate unfolded through radio and television in almost every household in not only America, but other countries as well.
Source: KPFK
Andrea Dworkin is a well-known radical American feminist, anti-pornography activist, pro-women activist, writer, and poet. She is author of "Pornography : Men Possessing Women", "Women Hating", and several other titles. They talk about her newest novel, "Mercy", which is a chronological story of a woman who has been raped.
Source: KPFA
First in a series of programs on the history and activities of the CIA leading up to the investigation of the CIA by the United States senate in July this year. Report based largely on William J. Palmeroy's book The Philippines: a CIA testing ground, about the CIA and U.S. actions in the Philippines after World War II; readings by David Boxall, Mike Hodel, Emily Schiller, Tim McGovern, and Jim Berland. BROADCAST: KPFK, May 30, 1975.
Source: KPFK
Josy Catoggio of Feminist Magazine interviews June Jordan, author of "Haruko/Love Poems," "Technical Difficulties," and "On Call: Political Essays, 1981-1985," on her writing, politics, feminism, racism and the state of America. Jordan reads her poem "Postscript for Haruko: On War and Peace" from her book "Haruko/Love Poems." (Program ends at 00:28:21, but additional material continues)
Source: KPFK
Molly Ivins (1944-2007), an American newspaper columnist, commentator, and best-selling author, presents a compelling, insightful and humorous lecture on the state of U.S. politics running up to the presidential elections this same year. Her keynote address was for the 48th Annual World Affairs Conference in Boulder, Colorado. She covers several topics including immigration, campaigning finances, women's rights, bilingual education, Telecommunications Act, and more. After the address, she is...
Source: KPFK
Robert Krulwich hosts the Washington Report live from Washington, D.C. Episode contains a recording of Jimmy Breslin addressing the National Women's Democratic Club about New York City's financial troubles; "Economics for the Dummy"; Catherine Ferguson speaking with Senator Frank Church, head of the Intelligence investigation; and Ted Clark speaking to the People's Bicentennial Commission. Broadcast on WBAI, July 3, 1975.
Source: WBAI
Victor Marchetti, former CIA agent and co-author with John D. Marks of "The CIA and The Cult of Intelligence", discusses the harassment he received while writing the book, and about CIA activities in Latin America. Marchetti discusses what the role of the CIA ought to be and how to fix what's wrong with the agency, such as allocating the duties of strategic intelligence to a civilian agency. He discusses his background, why he left the CIA, and the reasons why he chose to write the...
Source: KPFK
Philip Agee speaks about his experiences as a CIA agent in the 1960s, predominantly in South America.
Source: KPFK
The two hour chronology of highlights of phase 1 of the Senate Watergate hearings from May 17, 1973 to August 7, 1973. The program also includes Watergate news that took place outside of the hearing room. It is a comprehensive look at the way Watergate unfolded through radio and television in almost every household in not only America, but other countries as well.
Source: KPFK
Peggy Spina speaks with Viola Farber (February 25, 1931-December 24, 1998), a German-American dancer and choreographer who started her own company, The Viola Farber Dance Company. Farber speaks about her inspiration for her choreography comes from simple movements she sees throughout her day by taking actions of people but removing the emotions.
Source: WBAI
Open Journal episode concerning reports of the CIA employing newsmen for information gathering and dissemination, including CIA director William Colby's testimony before the House on Intelligence Commission on utilizing foreign news agencies for planting false stories. Episode begins with Robert Krulwich's report, which includes a speech by journalist Stuart Loory on the three dozen reporters discovered on the CIA's payroll. Broadcast on KPFK in 1975.
Source: KPFK
David Rothenberg interviews Charles S. Dutton about August Wilson's play "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom" in which he now stars on Broadway as Levee the trumpeter. He won the Tony Award nomination for Best Actor. Dutton talks about his life in reform school, juvenile court and Maryland Prison. He speaks of how his passion and love of acting came to be.
Source: WBAI
Pacifica Radio Archives
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Matthew Jones, field secretary for Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) from Knoxville, TN, gives background on how he became involved with the SNCC, his experience with restaurant sit-ins, voter registration, and other non-violent movements with "mixed" groups. Various recorded reports from Jackson, Miss. are made about protests, bombings, harassment, and Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. Voter registration drives and freedom schools functioned as usual. Fundraisers...
Source: KPFA
Children of several of Hollywood's blacklisted entertainment professionals discuss their families' experiences and the effects of their parents being blacklisted. Hosted by Larry Ceplair. Panel includes Stephen Carnovsky, Emily Corey, Dan Bessie, Becca Wilson, Chris Trumbo, and Tom Levitt. Recorded at the Los Feliz theater in Los Angeles. Broadcast on KPFK, ca. Apr. 26, 1977. Panel presented as part of the Retrospective on the Blacklist Period at the Los Feliz theater in Los Angeles, likely on...
Source: KPFK
Recording contains the Nina Sheldon Trio performing Wayne Shorter's "Footprints" and Antonio Carlos Jobim's "Wave" at the Village Gate in New York City, with Nina Sheldon on piano and vocals, Wayne Dockery on bass, and Adam Nussbaum on drums. An interview with Nina Sheldon by Bill Farrar follows the set. Show cuts back to studio and Coleman Hawking and Bud Powell's performance of "Blues in the Closet" from "Hawk in Germany."
Source: WBAI
Judy Pasternak interviews Margo St. James, self-described prostitute and sex positive feminist who is the founder of COYOTE (Call Off Your Old Tired Ethics), which is a sex worker activist organization. She discusses the stigma of pornography and prostitution and the attempt to change the stigma by reclaiming the words "dike" and "whore" as well as her goal to decriminalize prostitution and pimping.
Source: WBAI
Victor Marchetti, former CIA agent and co-author with John D. Marks of CIA and the Cult of Intelligence, talks with Tim McGovern about his reasons for leaving the CIA, CIA programs in Vietnam, paramilitary operations in Latin America, and domestic intelligence. Broadcast on KPFK ca. 1977.
Source: KPFK
Victor Marchetti was a high ranking CIA official who resigned and criticized the agency. He discusses his novel "Rope-Dancer" which was published in 1971. The novel is about a high ranking agent who goes to work for the Soviet Union and presents a realistic portrait of life at the CIA headquarters in Virginia. Marchetti discusses the CIA's role in foreign and domestic affairs, and what it is like to work in the organization.
Source: WBAI
Steve Weisman reports on pickets at State Capitol and delegation of FSM representatives and others who were not received by governor, protests at UC Davis in support of FSM, and demands that Governor Brown not press charges against arrested demonstrators. Sociology Professor John Leggett reads telegram from James Farmer, national chair of C.O.R.E., regarding the recent demonstrations which involved fundamental issues of the rights of free speech and peaceful protest and how students have been...
Source: KPFA
On the legal problems facing Paul Skyhorse and Richard Mohawk, American Indian defendants charged with murder. American Indian Movement leaders George Martin and Ernie Peters and defense team members Jack Schwartz and Wendy Eaton discuss the case. Broadcast on KPFK, June 23, 1977.
Source: KPFK
Recording contains interviews and speeches regarding CIA misconduct and former CIA agents speaking out against the organizations' activities. Pt.1. Tim McGovern interview of former CIA agent Philip Agee about his book and experiences in Latin America (from TSR 8/17/75). Includes a report on the Rockefeller Commission --Pt.2. Dave Boxall reads an excerpt from the Rockefeller Commission report to the President on the CIA's activities within the U.S. Excerpt is a report on "Operation...
Source: KPFK
Panel discussion on the Black/White relations in light of the recent release of the U.S. Riot Commission Report and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The panel is moderated by Gus Matzorkis and includes Clifford McClain of the Neighborhood Adult Participation Project in Los Angeles, Lou Smith, President of Operation Bootstrap in South Central Los Angeles, Reverend James Hargett, Los Angeles Convener of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Reverend Paul Kittlaus of the...
Source: KPFK
Complete air-check of Radio Free Oz episode in which "Michael Agnello" and "Peter Lief" of the "Provo" movement are interviewed by host Peter Bergman, receiving calls and answering questions from listeners. Eventually members of the Hollywood "Provo" group arrive, take over the airwaves, and shut down the show. Produced by Peter Bergman. Last broadcast on KPFK July 24, 1974. Also see KZ4053 .
Source: KPFK
Rita Mae Brown is an American author who talks about her book "Venus Envy", which is about a woman who comes out about her sexuality after a misdiagnosis of lung cancer, as well as telling everybody what she thinks. Brown has authored several other books such as "Rubyfruit Jungle", "A Nose of Justice" and the "Sister Jane Foxhunting Mystery" series.
Source: KPFA
Ganienkeh, also known as the "Land of the Flint," is the ancestral territory of the Mohawk Nation which is located in the New York Adirondack Preserve. Speakers examine the treaties, incidents, and struggles amongst the traditional Mohawk community.
Source: WBAI
Charles Ruas interviews Meredith Monk about the adaptation of her opera Quarry for radio. Meredith Monk is an American composer, singer, director and choreographer who is a pioneer in what is now called interdisciplinary performance. The theater piece モQuarryヤ was first performed at the off-Broadway theater, La MaMa, in New York. The story is about the rise of dictatorship through the eyes of a child. Ruas and Monk discuss the difference between the live and radio performance, as well as...
Source: WBAI
Recording contains dramatic readings from Rosalyn Drexler (born 1926), accomplished Pop-Art painter, author and playwright's books "I am the Beautiful Stranger," "One or Another," "To Smithereens," and "The Cosmopolitan Girl," interspersed with interview footage of Drexler discussing her life and writing. Readings performed by Drexler herself, Jan Albert (Producer), and David Rapkin (Technical producer).
Source: WBAI
Katherine Ferguson reports on COINTELPRO Operation Hoodwink, IRS intelligence operations including Special Service Staff, the cost of intelligence, and Robert Krulwich reports on Nixon's plot to prevent Allende's presidency in Chile. Broadcast on KPFK May 30, 1975.
Source: KPFK
Disc 1: Students participating in sit-in begin by singing "Hatikva" and Zum Gali Gali" in celebration of Hanukkah. An unidentified speaker leads a discussion on what constitutes non-violence, strategies for non-violent action, and anticipation of police action. Students then sing "Mayim Mayim". Chancellor Edward Strong addresses crowd in Sproul Hall requesting the students to disperse or failure to do so will result in disciplinary action by the university. Lt. M.F....
Source: KPFA
Panel discussion of the events leading up to and including the blacklisting of several Hollywood entertainment professionals in the 1940s. Panel includes Abraham Polonsky (labor organizer, writer, and filmmaker), Edward Biberman (artist and anti-fascism activist), Sam Brody (Film and Photo League), and Emil Freed (Southern California Library for Social Studies and Research). Panel presented as part of the Retrospective on the Blacklist Period at the Los Feliz theater in Los Angeles, likely on...
Source: KPFK
Robert Hinton hosts this episode which features testimony given before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on the effects of the war in Vietnam on the American economy on Thursday, April 16th, 1970. The testimony featured was given on the second day of the hearings by Eliot Janeway, economist and business consultant, and Gordon Sherman, President of Midas International. The Senate Committee Chairman was J. William Fulbright of Arkansas.
Source: WBAI
Benjamin J. "Ben" Legere, 1887-1972, actor, playwright, and labor leader in both the American and Canadian Labor movements as an I.W.W. organizer and as a member of the General Executive Board of the Canadian One Big Union, discusses his life. This recording is likely source material used for the series "Reminiscences of a Rebel: the autobiography of Benjamin J. Legere," which broadcast on WBAI in October 1966 (from KPFA).
Source: KPFA
Judy Chicago (b. 1939) discusses "The Dinner Party," and women in the arts with Ann Stubs. Chicago's 5 year, 500 person collaboration, "The Dinner Party," a tribute to women's history and achievements, is on view at the Brooklyn Museum through Jan. 18, 1981. Chicago tells how she sees art and feminism as indivisible and sees her long term struggles in the light of women's history.
Source: WBAI
On Monday May 24th, C.J. Thompson interviews Linda Newland on sailing. She speaks of the role of women in sailing and how she gradually learned the different job tasks on the boat. She has sailed the Pacific coast, competed in several races to Hawaii, and sailed single handed in a race to Japan.
Source: KPFA
Alice Walker, an African-American author, poet, and activist, is interviewed by Kris Welch. Walker talks about her non-fiction book and documentary, "Warrior Marks : Female Genital Mutilation and the Sexual Blinding of Women" which was co-written by Pratibha Parmar. She speaks of the origin and process of female mutilation and circumcision.
Source: KPFA
This five-part series on race and democracy includes compelling conversations and speeches that explore where issues of race and democracy collide. The series looks at how racism and racial realities pose a challenge to our democracy. Hate-related violence topics include the bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma, the assassination of Israeli prime minister Yitzhak Rabin, and the torching of a store in New York, which have all been traced to inflammatory speech. Citizens are asking if...
Source: Pacifica National Programming